The Camellias of Filoli – Part 3

Most people have heard of the flowering plants of the species Camellia japonicaCamellia reticulata, and the hybrid Camellia x williamsii, but even more people are familiar with another species: Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze. The leaves of Camellia sinsensis are used to make tea. I would not, however, recommend that one try to make tea from the leaves of the camillias shown here.

Camellia japonica 'Margaret McCown'

Camellia japonica ‘Margaret McCown’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Margaret McCown’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Camellia japonica 'Monjisu Red'

Camellia japonica ‘Monjisu Red’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Monjisu Red’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Camellia japonica 'Pink Perfection'

Camellia japonica ‘Pink Perfection’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Pink Perfecion’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Camellia japonica 'Prince Eugene Napoleon'

Camellia japonica ‘Prince Eugene Napoleon’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Prince Eugene Napoleon’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Camellia japonica 'Professor Charles S. Sargent'

Camellia japonica ‘Professor Charles S. Sargent’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Professor Charles S. Sargent’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Camellia japonica 'Purity'

Camellia japonica ‘Purity’

SOURCE:  Camellia japonica ‘Purity’ (Woodside, San Mateo County, California); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 19 February 2017.

Copyright © 2017 by Stephen J. Danko

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