The Alexander Skowronski Family in the 1940 United States Federal Census

My uncle Michael Danko would eventually marry Jean Barbara Skowronski and my uncle Joseph Danko would eventually marry Helen Skowronski.  In 1940, both Jean and Helen were living with their parents Alexander Skowronski and Frances Dymek at 3 Marion Ave, Worcester, Worcester Co., Massachusetts.  At that time, Jean was married to her first husband, Robert Sharron.  Robert died just 6 years after this census was taken.

1940 US Federal Census Record for the Alexander Skowronski Family (Left)

The 1940 US Federal Census Record for the Skowronski Family (Left)

1940 US Federal Census Record for the Skowronski Family (Right)

The 1940 US Federal Census Record for the Skowronski Family (Right)

SOURCE: 1940 U.S. Census, Worcester County, Massachusetts, population schedule, Worcester, enumeration district (ED) 23-102A, sheet 11A, household 152, Alexander Skowronski; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 07 April 2012); citing National Archives microfilm publication T627 roll 01715.

Click on the link for a PDF copy of the 1940 US Federal Census Record for the Alexander Skowronski Family.

The record states that:

    • The Skowronskis lived at 3 Marion Ave, Worcester, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, USA on 01 April 1940, they were household 152 in order of visitation, they owned their home which was worth $7100, except for Robert Sharron they lived in the same house on 01 April 1935, and they did not live on a farm
    • Alexander Skowronski was head of household, was a white male, 53 years old, married, was not attending school, completed 6 years of school, was born in Poland, was a naturalized citizen, was not working the week of March 24-30, was not doing public emergency work, was not seeking work, had a job or business, worked 25 hours the week of March 24-30 as a moulder in a [freemount fanaly?], was working in private work, worked 25 weeks in 1939, earned $1000, and did not earn more than $50 from sources other than wages
    • Frances Skowronski, wife of Alexander, was a white female, 53 years old, married, was not attending school, completed 0 years of school, was born in Poland, was not a US citizen, was not working the week of March 24-30, was not doing public emergency work, was not seeking work, did not have a job or business, and was doing housework
    • Helena Skowronski, daughter of Alexander and Frances, was a white female, 17 years old, single, was attending school, completed 9 years of school, was born in Massachusetts, was not working the week of March 24-30, was not doing public emergency work, was not seeking work, did not have a job or business, and was a student
    • Robert Sharron, son-in-law of Alexander and Frances, was a white male, 24 years old, single, was not attending school, completed 8 years of school, was born in Massachusetts, worked 16 hours the week of March 24-30, was not doing public emergency work, was not seeking work, did not have a job or business, worked as a truck driver for W. W. Window Co., worked 32 weeks in 1939, earned $800, did not earn more than $50 from sources other than wages, and resided in Millbury, Worcester Co., Massachusetts on 01 Apr 1935
    • Jean Sharron, daughter of Alexander and Frances, was a white female, 23 years old, single, was not attending school, completed 8 years of school, was born in Massachusetts, was not working the week of March 24-30, was not working the week of March 24-30, was not doing public emergency work, was not seeking work, did not have a job or business, normally worked as a packer in [Ti factory?], normally worked in private work, worked 12 weeks in 1939, earned $204, and did not earn more than $50 from sources other than wages

In addition to the regular questions, supplementary questions were asked about Alexander Skowronski, but no answers were provided in the census.  There is no indication about who answered the questions for the census.

Copyright © 2012 by Stephen J. Danko

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