Mosques and Minarets in Tunis, Tunisia

I arrived in Tunis, the capital of Tunisia during Ramadan, the Islamic month for fasting.  During Ramadan, Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, and smoking during daylight hours.  In Tunis, mosques are as common as Roman Catholic churches are in Rome.  While not permitted to enter the mosques, I was able to take pictures of the minarets of several of mosques, including Al-Zaytuna, Kasbah, Hammouda Pacha, and Youssef Dey, all located in the Medina area of Tunis.

Al-Zaytuna is the oldest mosque in Tunis, built before or during the Abbasid Caliphate (750-1258 AD).  The minaret was built in 1894 and is similar to that of the Kasbah Mosque.  The Kasbah Mosque itself was built in 1230 AD, during the Almohad Caliphate (1121-1269 AD).  The Hammouda Pacha Mosque was built in 1655 AD and the Youssef Dey Mosque was built in 1631 AD, both during the rule of the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923 AD).

Minaret of Al-Zaytuna Mosque

Minaret of Al-Zaytuna Mosque

SOURCE:  Minaret of Al-Zaytuna Mosque (Tunis, Tunis Governorate, Tunisia); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 07 August 2011.

Minaret of Kasbah Mosque

Minaret of Kasbah Mosque

SOURCE:  Minaret of Kasbah Mosque (Tunis, Tunis Governorate, Tunisia); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 07 August 2011.

Minaret of Hammouda Pacha Mosque

Minaret of Hammouda Pacha Mosque

SOURCE:  Minaret of Hammouda Pacha Mosque (Tunis, Tunis Governorate, Tunisia); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 07 August 2011.

Minaret of Youssef Dey Mosque

Minaret of Youssef Dey Mosque

SOURCE:  Minaret of Youssef Dey Mosque (Tunis, Tunis Governorate, Tunisia); photographed by Stephen J. Danko on 07 August 2011.

Copyright © 2011 by Stephen J. Danko

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